The 7 Deadly Sins of Alcohol

7 Deadly Types of Cancer

Directly Linked

to Alcohol Consumption

Image result for guzzle wine

By now, you’re probably aware that alcohol can do some pretty significant damage to your body. Drinking even moderate amounts of alcohol can and will do some lasting damage to your system if you’re not careful. Of course, almost everyone is going to have a drink here and there. Aside from the well-known issues associated with alcohol consumption, you should know that drinking has a direct relationship with one of the deadliest diseases in the world: cancer.
Scientists have known that there is a relationship between alcohol consumption and cancer for a long time. There’s plenty of evidence to suggest alcohol is carcinogenic, but we don’t often think of it as being as destructive or dangerous as other substances like tobacco. A new study, conducted by researcher Jennie Connor at the department of preventive and social medicine at the University of Otago in New Zealand, suggests that it’s time we take the carcinogenic properties of alcohol more seriously.

 Alcohol as a carcinogen — further evidence

Published in the journal Addiction, Connor’s research shows that drinking is more or less a direct cause of no less than seven types of cancers. Again, we already knew alcohol consumption increased the likelihood of a cancer diagnosis, but Connor’s work says that 5.8% of the world’s cancer deaths can be attributed to drinking — a figure we didn’t have before.

“There is strong evidence that alcohol causes cancer at seven sites in the body and probably others. Current estimates suggest that alcohol-attributable cancers at these sites make up 5.8% of all cancer deaths world-wide,” the study concludes. “Confirmation of specific biological mechanisms by which alcohol increases the incidence of each type of cancer is not required to infer that alcohol is a cause.”

For more details, be sure to read through the entire brief. But for the specific types of cancers Connor’s study points out, read on.

1. Liver cancer

Drinking does damage to your liver, there was never much doubt about that. And we already knew that booze can have a potent carcinogenic effect on the liver. This study simply adds another log to the proverbial bonfire, as far as evidence goes. If you care about your liver, it would serve you well to moderate your drinking habits.

2. Colon cancer

Colon health isn’t something you hear much about, especially compared to all the campaigns focusing on breast or prostate health awareness. But aside from cancers of the lung, colon cancer is the second-most-deadly form you can be diagnosed with. For that reason, you’ll want to take the risks very seriously.

3. Breast cancer

If you’ve been on Earth for any amount of time over the past decade or so, you’ve seen all of the work being done to raise awareness about breast cancer, and the risks and dangers associated with it. Well, it turns out that drinking and alcohol consumption are one of those risks.

4. Rectal cancer

Cancers of the rectum are closely associated with and are sometimes synonymous to those of the bowel and the colon. But they’re not exactly the same, and there are some differences in the treatment courses for each. If you’d rather not deal with either, staying away from booze should be added to your list.

5. Larynx cancer

When you drink, you’re putting your larynx in harm’s way — almost directly. Your larynx is what many people may commonly call a voice box. It’s the structure in your throat that holds your vocal cords and passages to your lungs. Needless to say, it’s pretty important, and if you want to avoid a diagnosis, steer clear of alcohol.

6. Oesophageal cancer

As far as your neck and throat goes, the larynx isn’t the only biological structure in danger from your drinking habits. The esophagus, or the tube that connects your mouth to your stomach, is also at risk. As booze passes from bottle to belly, it seems there’s some real damage being done.

7. Oropharyngeal cancer

Last but not least, the oropharynx is another part of the throat and digestive system that’s put at serious risk by drinking alcohol. The base of your tongue, your tonsils, and other parts of your throat are all a part of the oropharynx. If you can’t imagine life without those, then cutting out alcohol would be a wise choice — at least according to the available research.


7 Deadly Types of Cancer

Directly Linked

Image result for cancer

to Alcohol Consumption

Repeat Offender Hall of Shame

Repeat Offender

Hall of Shame

 

WARNING: We urge you to visit the traffic court in your county and observe the proceedings on how drunk drivers and repeat offenders are getting plea bargained back out on the streets – to endanger you and your children, as you see on this site. At least once a week.

There is nothing that takes a higher priority. The courts belong to you, your tax dollars fund their salaries. They are your employees. Leah Johnson.

Be aware through Citizen’s Advocates 4 Justice web site that your constitutional rights are being violated by your criminal justice system as you can see from their lengthy arrest records below. Your 14th amendment to due process has been violated. This has been going on for years unbeknownst to us. There is no higher crime than violating their sacred oath to uphold your constitutional rights to protect your family. (People have said it’s mass murder) Many of these tragedies were preventable if we had responsible and ethical government. It is time we incarcerate these political criminals for all the justice denied to law abiding citizens.

To honor the memory of Laura and Dina and all others whose lives were destroyed needlessly, sign our petitions for power of the people. Approximately 50,000 drivers are charged with driving while intoxicated in Illinois per year. Of those, an estimated 20% are repeat offenders. Calculated, that means 10,000 people annually are charged with more than one DUI violation. Statistics show that the percentage of repeat offenders increases to 33% nationally. It is frightening to think of what happens when those figures are compounded year after year.

We are sharing our highways with hundreds of thousands of repeat drunk drivers – potential time bombs just waiting to explode, endangering the lives of those around us. Drunk driving has been called the nation’s most frequently committed violent crime, yet light sentences and dismissed charges continue to prevail. Our own criminal justice system is enabling these criminals to strike again and again. How many lives will be destroyed before something is done?  Citizen’s Advocates 4 Justice is ready to take action, but we need your support.

Click on the link below:

Drunk driving repeat offenders


Repeat Offender Hall of Shame

Alcohol Body Damage

Alcohol Body Damage

Having a glass or two of wine is fine, but what happens when you drink too much alcohol too quickly?

Many people have woken up after a night of drinking with a firm resolution in mind: “I’m never drinking again.” Far too often, one drink turns into two and two turns into many more and, eventually, we find ourselves drunk.

When someone is intoxicated, that person loses a lot of the motor skills that he or she possesses when he or she isn’t drunk. Imagine a drunk person trying to read that last sentence — it just wouldn’t sound good. Other than slurred speech, we all know what drunk people look like: They drop glasses, they stumble around, and they often they wind up making regrettable decisions.

When someone drinks too much and doesn’t remember what happened, he or she has experienced a blackout. While there are different underlying factors that influence a blackout, there’s one common theme amongst those experiencing one: A blackout represents a dangerously high level of intoxication. If you don’t remember things that happened after going out, you’ve simply had far too much to drink. Other than losing valuable possessions, embarrassing yourself on the dance floor, and potentially having unprotected sex with a stranger (and let’s not even mention the carnage that could occur if you drive a car in that condition), blacking out can lead to much more dire consequences.

Drinking to the point of a blackout can often lead to physical harm or, in the worst cases, death. We’ve done some research behind blackouts and also reached out to some experts in the field of substance abuse in order to help inform readers of what is actually happening during an alcohol-induced blackout.

Jay Woody, MD, co-founder and chief medical officer of Legacy ER & Urgent Care, helped us learn more about blacking out, and Dr. Nikki Martinez, Psychologist, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC), a specialist in substance abuse, warns against the potentially deadly outcomes of over consumption.

If someone is “in a blackout, they can easily have reached the point of alcohol poisoning,” says Dr. Martinez. “When someone does, they can choke on their own vomit, [and] if they have mixed with medication, their central nervous system can slow their respiration so much they stop breathing.”

Alcohol Body Damage

DUI Justice Long Overdue

Chronic drunken driver gets prison

in Naperville DUI case

David R. Carlson

a 62-year-old man who whose blood-alcohol content was more than three times the legal limit when he crashed his SUV in Naperville last year was sentenced Wednesday to three years in prison for his fourth DUI conviction.

Naperville police said they found 15 cans of beer inside David R. Carlson’s sport utility vehicle following the Feb. 6, 2015, crash on the city’s far northwest side. A breath test determined Carlson’s blood-alcohol content at the time was .278.

Carlson, of the 5300 block of Woodland Drive in Oak Forest, pleaded guilty Wednesday to a felony charge of aggravated DUI/fourth violation, according to DuPage County court records.

Three other counts of aggravated DUI were dismissed in exchange for the plea, as were five traffic citations, records showed. Judge Robert A. Miller accepted Carlson’s plea and sentenced him to prison, followed by two years of mandatory supervised release, records said.

Carlson crashed his vehicle at the intersection of North Aurora Road and Route 59, landing in a concrete ditch created by the mammoth Route 59 reconstruction project under way at the time.

Police found Carlson walking toward a nearby pharmacy, and when asked if he had been drinking, Carlson said, “Don’t do this to me,” and that he had “to take care of his wife,” who was not with him at the time, police reports said. Carlson also claimed “his doctor was sending him to the hospital tomorrow for alcoholism,” the report said.

Carlson could not perform the sobriety tests police administered on the scene, and 10 empty beer cans and five full cans were found on the floor and center console of his SUV.

At the time of his arrest, Carlson was wanted on arrest warrants for DUI cases pending in DuPage and Lake counties and in Crown Point, Ind. Carlson had had his license revoked several times for DUI, reports said.

Attempts to reach members of Carlson’s family by telephone for comment Wednesday were unsuccessful.

Carlson is being held in the DuPage County Jail pending his transfer to the Illinois Department of Corrections.

wbird@tribpub.com

Copyright © 2016, Naperville Sun

ALCOHOL IS ONLY for GULLIBLE FOOLS

ALCOHOL IS ONLY for GULLIBLE FOOLS

Cheers! Proost! Santé! Salud!

Washing down some cold ones is an international pastime, but people around the world are drinking less alcohol for the first time since 2001, MarketWatch reported. Except for Americans, that is.

According to Euromonitor International, a market research firm, consumption fell from 249.7 billion liters in 2014 to 248 billion liters in 2015. (That’s a 0.7% decrease.)  Global alcohol consumption has been steadily rising ever since Euromonitor International began tracking market trends in 2001, so this is an unprecedented dip.

But there’s some good news for the beer and spirits industry, at least: North Americans are still boozing it up. (Good job, ‘merica!) In 2015, the continent bought 33.8 billion liters of alcohol, 700 million more liters than in 2014. 

Small batch brew-loving hipsters (and everyone else who likes fancy brewskis) might have something to do with it, too. The strong North American economy and the popularity of craft beer and microbreweries have given sales a bump, analyst Spiros Malandrakis told MarketWatch.

The World Is Drinking Less Alcohol, but Fear Not, America's Picking up the Slack

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Other than suds, what else quenches America’s thirst? Beer is far and away the beverage of choice for Americans, but 34% of Americans who drink say they prefer sipping wine, and 21% drink liquor most often, Gallup reported in 2015.

The World Is Drinking Less Alcohol, but Fear Not, America's Picking up the Slack

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Data from Gallup shows Americans prefer beer over other types of alcohol
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Mo’ money, mo’ drinking: No matter the country, economic strength has a strong influence on alcohol sales. MarketWatch reported that the struggling economies in China and Brazil led to less alcohol consumption in 2015. Similarly, U.S. consumption fell during the 2008 to 2009 recession, a Harvard School of Public Health study showed. 

But in an ironic twist, wild nights might not be so great for the economy. A 2015 reportfrom the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that binge drinking, aka consuming four to five drinks in a matter of two hours, cost the U.S. economy $250 billion in 2010 due to lost productivity and alcohol-fueled crimes.

So… better rethink that last tequila shot. For your future self, and for your country.

 ALCOHOL IS ONLY

for GULLIBLE FOOLS

Alcohol and Cancer

Alcohol and Cancer

Alcohol’s cancer risks outweigh any health benefits, study shows

Maria GallucciJuly 22, 2016

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Drinking alcohol is a direct cause of at least seven forms of cancer, and the more you drink, the higher your risk, a new analysis found.

The report’s author said she hoped to cut through the barrage of studies and stories that can leave readers with conflicting views of alcohol’s effects.

After all, isn’t a nightly glass of wine supposed to be good for you?

SEE ALSO: Couples who get drunk together, stay together, according to a new study

“There is no argument, on current evidence, for a safe level of drinking with respect to cancer,” Jennie Connor, the author and a professor of epidemiology at Otago University in New Zealand, wrote in the analysis, published Thursday in the scientific journal Addiction.

She added that studies touting the perceived health benefits of casual drinking are “seen increasingly as disingenuous or irrelevant,” given the rising risks of a range of cancers.

Connor’s report found there is strong evidence that alcohol causes cancer of the liver, colon, rectum, esophagus, larynx, pharynx and female breast.

Image: Getty Images/EyeEm Premium
Her conclusions are based on comprehensive research and analyses carried out in the last decade by groups such as the World Cancer Research Fund, a U.K.-based nonprofit, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer, an arm of the World Health Organization in France.

Scientists at the agency similarly highlighted the link between alcohol and the same seven cancers in a 2013 paper published in the journal Future Oncology.

“Alcohol consumption is one of the most important known risk factors for human cancer and potentially one of the most avoidable factors, but it is increasing worldwide,” the authors of that study wrote.

Around 5.8 percent of total cancer-related deaths, or nearly half a million deaths, were directly caused by alcohol in 2012, a group of U.S., Canadian and Italian scientistsestimated last year.

Image: Getty Images for NYX Professional Makeup

U.S. alcohol producers pushed back against Connor’s analysis.

“To declare that alcohol definitively causes cancer based upon cherry-picked epidemiology articles lacks scientific credibility,” Sam Zakhari, senior vice president of scientific affairs for Distilled Spirits Council, a national trade group, said in an emailed statement.

“Cancer is a complex disease that is not yet entirely understood and requires more research,” he said.

Connor’s report noted the risks of getting cancer from drinking is highest among heavy drinkers, a group roughly defined as men who drink more than four alcoholic beverages a day, and women who drink more than three.

But even light consumption — typically one daily drink for women, and two for men — can “minimally” raise the overall cancer risk, Harvard University researchers found in a2015 paper.

In the U.S., one drink is equal to a 12 ounce can of beer, a 5 ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits, according to the American Cancer Society.

Those risks multiply for people who both drink and regularly smoke, particularly when it comes to cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx and esophagus, Connor said.

Image: Getty Images

That doesn’t mean people who drink are necessarily doomed to get those cancers. And there’s some evidence that people who ditch alcohol can reduce their risks of liver, laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers, according to the Addiction report.

Still, Connor noted that, while heavy drinkers face higher cancer risks, low to moderate drinkers still experience a “considerable burden” of health hazards from alcohol. Yet many people don’t know about the risks, a problem Connor partly attributed to the news of alcohol’s potential benefits.

In an interview with the Guardian, Jana Witt, a health information officer at Cancer Research U.K., applauded the study and offered a few simple tips for lowering alcohol consumption.

“Having some alcohol-free days each week is a good way to cut down on the amount you’re drinking,” Witt said. “Also, try swapping every other alcohol drink for a soft drink, choosing smaller servings or less alcoholic versions of drinks, and not keeping a stock of booze at home.”

This article was updated to include comment from Distilled Spirits Council.

Alcohol and Cancer